Making Hats by Alison Hart explains how to make your own hats, using traditional construction methods using specialist millinery foundation materials and a range of fabrics and trimmings.

In this extract from the book, the step-by-step from Making your own Flower Trims takes you through instructions for how to make a Fabric Rose. This simple project requires no specialist millinery materials so is ideal for anyone aiming to brighten up a plain hat or headpiece.

For more complex projects, Making Hats has a range of step-by-steps – there are 26 different projects in total, as well as a list of suppliers and a range of techniques.

Published by The Crowood Press, ISBN: 9781785004933, Making Hats by Alison Hart is paperback, 128 pages, fully illustrated and priced £9.99.

www.crowood.com

Main picture: Round blocked buckram disc headpiece with a fabric rose trim, by Alison Hart.

1. Cut out a rectangle of fabric and fold in half with the wrong sides together. Measure a double length of matching thread. Knot the end.

2. Using a long running stitch, sew up one short end of the rectangle. Start sewing at the fold and work towards the open end.

3. Sew along the long side of the rectangle about 0.5cm from the edge. This will sew the two open edges together.

4. Sew up the other short edge and cut the needle free from the thread.

5. Carefully gather the rectangle by pulling the thread. Do this evenly, being careful not to snap the thread.

6. Arrange the fabric with the gathered edge in the centre. Roll the edge tightly to begin with. Once you are happy with this shape, sew a few stitches through the fabric to secure it.

7. Continue to roll the rest of the flower around the centre piece to form the petals. You may need to tighten or loosen the thread as you roll. Secure with stitches as you go.

8. Once the flower is complete, tuck the final end under, secure with a few stitches and cut the thread. Rethread the needle with the gathering thread and secure this through the fabric with a few stitches. The flower is finished and ready to sew onto a hat.

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