• Two-year-old colts and geldings. Six furlongs. First run 1877

The sixth Duke of Richmond gave his family name to this race in the days when future Classic winners were more precocious than they are now. 

A horse named Duke Of Richmond won the Richmond Stakes in 1883. Plenty of future stars have won this prestigious contest such as the St Leger hero Bayardo (1908), as well as Derby winners Persimmon (1895), Pommern (1914) and the Aga Khan’s 1935 victor, Mahmoud, who was possibly the best Richmond winner of them all. Palestine won in 1949 and progressed to take the 2,000 Guineas and Sussex Stakes in 1950. 

Nowadays, precocious types and future sprinters tend to win the Richmond Stakes and the sharp track puts the emphasis on speed, although the Richmond Stakes still produces Classic winners as Bachir’s 1999 victory proves. He went on to win both the French and Irish 2,000 Guineas for Godolphin the following year. 

The 2000 winner, Endless Summer, was disqualified when it came to light that he was actually a three-year-old, having been foaled on 31 December, 1997, and not 1 January, 1998, as registered.

Dick Turpin was a top-class winner for trainer Richard Hannon and jockey Richard Hughes in 2009. He took the
Group One Prix Jean Prat as a three-year-old. Hannon and Hughes, triumphant in 2008 with Prolific, reeled off a hat-trick as Libranno gained the spoils as 5–4 favourite in 2010 and managed a four-timer the following
year with Evens favourite Harbour Watch. 

Hannon, who also sent out the winner in 1992 with son Pardo, is the most successful trainer of the Audi Richmond stakes with five victories. 

Lester Piggott rode six winners of the race during his illustrious career, while 31 of the 66 market leaders since
1946 have come home in front. 

Audi, a long-time sponsor at Goodwood, takes over backing the Richmond stakes for the first time in 2012.

GUIDE TO GLORIOUS GOODWOOD 2012 – CLICK HERE

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